the history of
 
 

While I was busy building Thrust Magazine’s rock-solid reputation, Blackie was busy recruiting new staff. That same month, she introduced me to Tim Hubbard (a local photographer) and Stiff (an independent record label owner), two roommates who both wanted to join my growing team.


Tim was bred in the punk rock scene and spent his evenings and weekends photographing bands at punk rock clubs across Florida. Stiff, in similarity, was the last of the true punk rockers—an all-American, anti-establishment rebel, as fierce in his convictions as our nation’s radical forefathers. Like them, he hated the government—even more, he hated its politicians.


Stiff asked me before his first column, which appeared in the January 1990 issue, “Can I write about anything I want?”


I said, “Yes,” and The Great American Stiff—as I named his column—was born.


It wasn’t long before Thrust Magazine’s next key player, Louis “Chip” Mignacca, entered the scene. I met Louis in November 1989, right after I had published the first issue. He had a private office down and across the hall from my private office at a business suite complex where we both rented, and since he expressed an interest in rock-n-roll, I personally delivered a copy of the new issue of the magazine to him as soon as I had brought the circulation run back from the printer. Louis watched eagerly as I published the first four issues. In March 1990 I asked him to come onboard.


Before long Louis was pushing the capacity limits of his 1/2-ton Chevrolet Silverado to deliver Thrust Magazine from the printer to record stores, musical instrument stores, radio stations, and rock-and-roll clubs throughout Thrust’s circulation territory—the Tampa Bay, Florida, metropolitan area. While I looked like a Los Angeles-transplant long-hair rock-n-roller, Louis’ primary business—a wholesale food ingredients brokerage—required that he present a conservative appearance to his corporate clients. Though I suggested he take the title of Circulation Director, he suggested he become Thrust Magazine’s Director of Public Relations, to which I agreed. Louis held his official job title throughout the remainder of Thrust Magazine’s publishing journey, but his masthead moniker was there for the readers to see. Behind the scenes, Louis took the initiative to further Thrust Magazine—no matter what the task—and his undying commitment to the magazine remains true today—21 years after I published the first issue. Today, when people ask me about Thrust Magazine, I always describe Louis as my partner. Thrust Magazine was just as much his passion, as it was mine.


Go to History of Thrust Magazine Part 4

THE ORIGINS AND LIFE OF
THRUST MAGAZINE

While I looked like a Los Angeles-transplant long-hair rock-n-roller, Louis’ primary business—a wholesale food ingredients brokerage—required that he present a conservative appearance to his corporate clients. He suggested he become Thrust Magazine’s Director of Public Relations, to which I agreed. Louis held his official job title throughout the remainder of Thrust Magazine’s publishing journey ...”—

Christopher R. Phillips, Publisher and Editor

Whitesnake lead-guitarist Adrian Van Den Berg and Thrust Magazine’s founder/publisher/editor Christopher R. Phillips’ son Adrian Phillips pose for a moment in rock-n-roll history in January 1990.

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